You are currently browsing the monthly archive for February 2013.

Mom Leaves Kids In Car At Sacramento Mall

Mom Leaves Kids In Car At Sacramento Mall

Mom leaves kids in car while she drinks

Mom leaves kids in car while she drinks

Mom Leaves Her Kids In A Wrecked Car THEN GOES TO EAT ICE CREAM BUTT NAKED!!!!

Mom Leaves Her Kids In A Wrecked Car THEN GOES TO EAT ICE CREAM BUTT NAKED!!!!

Police: Mom Leaves Kids in Car While Tanning

Police: Mom Leaves Kids in Car While Tanning

 

Around the Web:

 

 2 Kids die in hot car when Georgia Mom falls asleep – New York …

 Mother leaves her 3 kids in car because 3-year-old ‘is a handful …

 Mother Leaves Infant in Car in Parking Lot in 102-Degree Heat: LAist

 Mom leaves kids in car wreck, goes to eat ice cream – naked

 Mugshot: Mom leaves kids in car, drinks at strip club? | HLNtv.com

 Mother Leaves Kids In Car While Tanning: Cops | NBC 10 …

 Mother leaves child on roof of car while driving, gets arrested | WJLA …

 Stoned Mom Leaves Baby On Roof Of Car, Drives Off

 Police: Mom leaves baby on top of car, drives off – USATODAY.com

 Mother of boy mauled at Pa. zoo won’t be charged

Most recent abuse cases

This archive contains cases of abuse of children within the child placement system.

Some of the these children have been killed, other’s survived but suffered from:

In several cases the abuse was hidden from authorities under the pretext of homeschooling.

For an overview of abuse cases by location, see this map.

To make this list as complete as possible we can use your help. If you know of cases not covered, or know of articles not listed with the cases, please subscribe to this group and help maintain this section of the website or send links and articles to this mail address.

Girl adopted by Jerome Mitchell and Hermina Ibarra

4-year-old girl adopted by Jerome Mitchell and Hermina Ibarra was allegedly abused by the couple. There also appeared to be signs of sexual abuse.
Date: 2013-01-16
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Prescott, Arizona
United States

See map: Google Maps

Two children adopted by Ingrid Brewer

Palmdale resident Ingrid Brewer reported to the sheriff’s department that her two adoptive children were missing on January 15. Deputies searching for the children, an 8-year-old boy and a 7-year-old girl, found them lying near a parked vehicle on a street near their residence hiding under a blanket. The children were not wearing warm clothing despite temperatures in the mid-20s.

The two children told deputies they ran away from Brewer because they were tired of being tied up and beaten by her. They told deputies that Brewer locked them up in separate bedrooms when she went to work every day, and that on numerous occasions she tied their wrists with zip-ties and beat them, sometimes with an electrical cord or a hammer. They were also reportedly deprived of food.

Both kids had injuries consistent with their descriptions of abuse, including wrist marks indicating zip-tie restraint.

Date: 2013-01-15
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal neglect, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive mother
Home schooling: yes

Placement

Organizations: Aspiranet

Location

United States

Baby Girl in foster case with Wilson Lee Tubbs III

5 month old girl died after being abused by Wilson Lee Tubbs III, aka Josh Tubbs. She had 2 skull fractures and numerous bruises after being in the home about 5 weeks. Tubbs’ wife was related to the baby girl’s parents
Date: 2012-12-02
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Foster father

Location

Fort Bragg, California
United States

See map: Google Maps

Teenage foster girl in Newcastle NSW

A teen-aged girl in New South Wales Australia was sexually abuse by her 65 year old foster father.
Date: 2012-11-30
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Foster father

Location

Newcastle, New South Wales
Australia

Children adopted by Nikki and Larry Russell

At least 3 of 4 children adopted from foster care by Nikki and Larry Russell were beaten, duct taped to their beds and deprived food.The 93 lb 17 year old was not in school, IcyHot was applied to his genitals and in his rectum. Russells also had a 5th biological child in the home.
Date: 2012-11-27
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal neglect, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Terre Haute, Indiana
United States

See map: Google Maps

Primary school-aged foster girl in Newcastle, Australia

A primary school-aged foster girl is raped by an employee of Family and Community Services, whose job it was to protect her.
Date: 2012-11-23
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Other non-family member

Location

Newcastle, New South Wales
Australia

Girls adopted by Tiffany and Dennis Jack

2 girls adopted by Tiffany J Jack and Lt Col Dennis E Jack were hit with spatulas, tied to potty chairs and required to do extreme exercises with soiled diapers on their heads. At least 3 other children were in the home.
Date: 2012-11-19
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Niceville, Florida
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Silver Springs Shores couple

A girl adopted by her great aunt and her husband was sexually abuse from age 6 until age 16. The man was about 77 years old when the abuse started. He was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.
Date: 2012-11-15
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father

Location

Silver Springs Shores, Florida
United States

See map: Google Maps

Alexander Laws

Ten days after being removed from his parent’s care, 2.5 year old Alexander Laws was hospitalized with injuries consistent with shaken baby syndrome. Foster mother Kasondra Martinsen left Alexander and a 6 year old foster child with her friend 21 year old Osbaldo “Nanno” Sanchez while she worked. Osbaldo Sanchez was not an approved child care provider, and he did not seek medical care for the child after he injured him.
Date: 2012-11-10
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal neglect
Abuser: Other non-family member

Homestudy

Organizations: Nevada Department of Human Resources, (Clark County Department of Family Services)

Placement

Location

Las Vegas, Nevada
United States

See map: Google Maps

Children adopted by Paul and JoAnn Drake

Paul Alan Drake and JoAnn Marie Drake are accused of locking their 13-year-old daughter and 14-year-old son in the basement for three to four weeks. The teens were fed by sliding a plate under the door and were allowed them out only to attend school. 3 other adopted children were not imprisoned.
Date: 2012-11-08
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Ankeny, Iowa
United States

See map: Google Maps

Boy adopted by Mona and Russell Hauer

8 year old boy adopted along with 2 siblings was beaten and fed a liquid only diet by Russell and Mona Hauer. He weighed 35 lbs, the size of a 4 year old. His bones were protruding and he had a swollen belly. Prior to adoption, the Hauers were advised he had suffered trauma and should be provided therapy. He was normal weight at that time. Less than 2 months outside the home, the boy had gained 15 lbs and 2 inches in height.
Date: 2012-11-06
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother
Home schooling: yes

Placement

Organizations: likely Nicollet County Social Services or Le Sueur County Human Services

Location

North Mankato, Minnesota
United States

See map: Google Maps

Boy in foster care of Sharanda Hammock

11 year old boy in foster care had burns on his legs and genitals and was dehydrated. His foster mother Sharanda Hammock and her girlfriend Cecily Sharp were charged with second-degree battery and permitting child abuse.
Date: 2012-11-04
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Foster mother, Other non-family member

Location

Fayetteville, Arkansas
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Dorothea Vega

Girl was beaten, confined in a room and given large amounts of psychotropic drugs and prevented from bathing.
Date: 2012-11-02
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive mother

Location

Pensacola, Florida
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girls adopted by Flagstaff AZ man

12 and 15 year old girls allegedly molested by 51 year old adoptive father in Timberline subdivision of Flagstaff, Arizona.
Date: 2012-11-02
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father

Location

flagstaff, Arizona
United States

See map: Google Maps

Logan Garrett and his twin sister

Logan Garrett
22 month old boy Logan Edward Garrett was adopted along with his twin sister by Jacky Scott Garrett and Emily Garrett. Logan died of blunt force trauma to his abdomen, about 7 months after placement, 1 week after adoption. He had many prior injuries. His sister was underweight and removed from the home. Adoptive father Scott Garrett was charged with capital murder.
Date: 2012-10-22
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive father

Placement

Organizations: a “private adoption arranged with the help of St. Philip’s Episcopal Church in Frisco”

Location

Frisco, Texas
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girls adopted by Hickory Hill couple

4 girls adopted by a Hickory Hill (Memphis) Tennessee family were raped by their adoptive father over 12 years. Their adoptive mother was aware of at least one incident and did nothing.The father is charged with 14 crimes including rape and rape of a child. The mother is charged with trying to obstruct the report.

Date: 2012-10-19
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Hickory Hill, Tennessee
United States

See map: Google Maps

Children adopted by Gregory Bernard Lacy and LaQuron D. McLean Lacy

Seven children, under the age of 11, adopted by Gregory Bernard Lacy and LaQuron D. McLean Lacy were sexually and physically abused by their adoptive parents.The Lacy’s had an in-house strip club where parties were held in the children’s presence. The children were hit with fists, belts, hangers and metal objects and one of the girls was molested by her adoptive father.

Date: 2012-10-12
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Perris, California
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Rajesh Sengar and Bebi Sengar

5-year-old girl adopted by Rajesh Sengar and Bebi Sengar was killed by her adoptive parents. Post mortem reports revealed the girl was sexually assaulted too.
Date: 2012-09-28
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse, Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother

Location

Indore, Madhya Pradesh
India

Children adopted by Douglas and Kristen Barbour

 
A 6-year-old boy and an 18-month-old girl, adopted from Ethiopia by Douglas and Kristen Barbour, were severely maltreated by their adoptive parents. The boy was malnourished and had skin lesions and the girl had signs of multiple skull fractures (abusive head trauma)  which caused her to be blind in one eye and partially paralyzed.
Date: 2012-09-14
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother
Fundamentalist faith: yes

Homestudy

Placement

Location

Franklin Park, Pennsylvania
United States

See map: Google Maps

Kacper and Klaudia, foster children of Anna and Wieslaw Cz.


3 year old boy and 5 year old girl beaten to death in separate incidents on July 3 and September 12, 2012. The family had 5 foster children, possibly all placed in their home since January 2012.
Date: 2012-09-12
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Foster father, Foster mother

Location

Puck
Poland

Boy in foster care of Mary Enzenbacher

2 year old boy in foster care with Mary Enzenbacher was severely beaten by her live-in boyfriend Anthony Walton. Mary observed the beatings over a few days but refused to seek medical treatment.
Date: 2012-08-21
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal neglect
Abuser: Other non-family member

Placement

Organizations: Hamilton County Job and Family Services

Location

Cincinnati, Ohio
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Jonathan Outlaw

A girl was sexually abused by her adopted father over 5 years. Jonathan Brett Outlaw is charged with 2 counts of sexual battery by a parent or custodian.
Date: 2012-08-13
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father

Location

brooksville, Florida
United States

See map: Google Maps

Boy adopted by Matthew and Amy Sweeney (Daniil Kruchin)

8-year-old boy adopted from Tula, Russia in June 2006 by Matthew and Amy Sweeney was allegedly systematically abused by his adoptive parents.
Date: 2012-07-19
Placement type: Adoption
Institution: Novomoskovsk Baby Home (Tula Oblast #3)
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother
Home schooling: yes

Placement

Organizations: Child of the Heart

Location

Bristow, Virginia
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Samuel and Diana Franklin

15 year old girl adopted by Diana and Samuel Franklin was confined in a chicken coop, required to wear a shock collar, and had food and water restricted.
Date: 2012-05-30
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother
Home schooling: yes
Fundamentalist faith: yes

Location

Butler, Georgia
United States

See map: Google Maps

Children adopted by Kelly Doreen Morris

4 biological siblings adopted by Kelly Morris are alleged to have been beaten and tortured.
Date: 2012-05-25
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive mother

Location

hanford, California
United States

See map: Google Maps

Children in foster care with Leeds man

A Leeds UK father and son sexually abused and took pornographic pictures of  two young children in foster care of the father.The father admitted a number of sex offences against children including four offences of rape of a child, two of inciting a child to engage in sexual activity and one of making indecent images of a child. He was jailed for 10 years and eight months. The son pleaded guilty to four offences of sexual activity with a child, five of sexual assault of a child and two of making indecent photographs of a child. The son was given an indeterminate prison after a report into his behaviour stated that he had “uncontrollable urges” towards children.

Date: 2012-05-15
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse, Sexual exploitation
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adopted sibling

Placement

Organizations: Leeds City Council Children’s Services

Location

Leeds, West Yorkshire
United Kingdom

Boys adopted by Leslie Tiesler and Brad Thill

Three adopted boys were starved, shot with a BB gun, beaten with a spoon, and confined to a tool chest for days with only a pipe for fresh air. Thills adopted 4 boys in 2008, Leslie had a bio son. They divorced in 2010, but Tiesler continued to live in Brad Thill’s house while he was overseas. Tiesler, the non-adopted son and one of the adopted boys participated in the abuse. Tiesler claimed the boys were homeschooled. Forty-fve days after removal from the home, the 3 abused boys had gained 27, 20 and 10 pounds.
Date: 2012-05-01
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse, Non-lethal deprivation
Abuser: Adoptive mother, Adopted sibling, Non-adopted sibling, Undetermined
Home schooling: yes

Location

Cameron, North Carolina
United States

See map: Google Maps

Bethany Loerke

Bethany Loerke was adopted from foster care at age 5 along with her younger bio sister. Sexual abuse by her adoptive father Dr. James Loerke began almost immediately and continued until Bethany told her adoptive mother when she was nearly 11.  James Loerke pleaded guilty to four counts of sexual molestation and was sentenced to 20 years, which was later reduced to 15 years.At 20 years old, Bethany chose to waive her anonymity to help other victims, and to help others understand the connection between childhood trauma and later juvenile delinquency.

Date: 2012-04-22
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father

Location

Tulsa, Oklahoma
United States

See map: Google Maps

Benjamin Yhip

Benjamin Yhip - Taiwan2-year-old boy adopted from Taiwan along with his twin brother by Dr. James Peter Yhip and Edelyn Magakat Yhip was killed by blunt force trauma to his head. Previously the boy had been hospitalized for malnutrition and broken bones.  Their daughter was adopted from China.
Both parents were arrested on suspicion of murder with Edelyn believed to have caused the head trauma.

Date: 2012-04-18
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother
Fundamentalist faith: yes

Location

Chico, California
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Paul Lavoe

Teenaged girl from Ghana was adopted by her relative Paul Lavoe and his wife, Amanda. She, along with Lavoe’s biological daughter was beaten with electrical cords. The girls were homeschooled so that they could care for younger siblings.
Date: 2012-04-16
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father
Home schooling: yes

Location

Milwaukee, Wisconsin
United States

See map: Google Maps

Children adopted by Peter and Tamara Gable

Some of seven children, adopted from the foster care system by Peter and Tamara Gable, were physically abused by their adoptive parents. The abuse consisted largely of cruel and unusual punishment.
Date: 2012-04-01
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father, Adoptive mother
Fundamentalist faith: yes

Location

Middlefield, Connecticut
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girls in care of Don and Beverly Copley

3 sisters were placed in foster care or guardianship of Don Copley and Beverly K. Copley after the oldest sister was raped by the girls’ father Kenneth Copley. Don D. Copley is Kenneth’s brother and the girl’s uncle. The girls were aged 13, 7 and 6 when placed with the Copleys in 1991.Sexual abuse of the 3 girls began almost immediately and continued for many years. Foster mother Beverly Copley, aka Doris Copley, was aware of the abuse. Charges were brought in 2012 when it appears another family victim was being abused.Don Dallas Copley pleaded guilty to 15 counts of rape for the 3 sisters and was sentenced to 60 years. Beverly’s case is pending.

Date: 2012-02-28
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Foster father, Foster mother

Placement

Organizations: Ohio Department of Job and Family Services, Lawrence County Children’s Services

Location

proctorville, Ohio
United States

See map: Google Maps

Boy in foster care in Kotovo, Russia

6 year old boy in Kotovo, Volgograd Russia was severely beaten by his foster mother for taking a piece of candy.
Date: 2012-02-24
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Non-lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Foster mother

Location

Kotovo, Volgograd
Russia

Joseph Maoping Adams

Boy born Oct 16, 2006 in Hangzhou, China and adopted to the US by Rick and Deah Adams. Died December 3. 2011 from ingesting a large amount of vinegar. His death was ruled a homicide by the county coroner. Deah Daniele Adams was charged with reckless homicide.
Date: 2012-02-10
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive mother
Disabilities: yes
Fundamentalist faith: yes

Location

Lexington, Kentucky
United States

See map: Google Maps

Alexis Long

Alexis Nicole Long
Alexis Nicole Long, 19 month old girl died of blunt force trauma after apparently being thrown onto a changing table by her adoptive mother Jennifer Long. Mrs. Long was charged with murder. Father Timothy Long was charged with second degree cruelty to children.
Date: 2012-01-31
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Lethal physical abuse
Abuser: Adoptive mother

Location

columbus, Georgia
United States

See map: Google Maps

Children in foster care with Mark O’Brien

At least 2 children in foster care with Mark Daniel O’Brien allege they were molested. O’Brien was charged with sodomy, molestation, and possession of child pornography.
Date: 2012-01-31
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Foster father

Location

Republic, Missouri
United States

See map: Google Maps

Girl adopted by Snohomish couple

A girl, removed from a polygamous clan in Utah, was placed for adoption with a couple who moved from Utah to Snohomish, WA. The girl was subsequently sexually abused by her adoptive father. A female Bothell, WA therapist had advised the adoptive couple to start sleeping with the girl.
Date: 2012-01-21
Placement type: Adoption
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Adoptive father

Location

Everett, Washington
United States

See map: Google Maps

Boys in Foster care in Calgary, Canada

At least one and maybe 3 boys aged 2, 4, and 6 were sexually assaulted by a 13 year old foster brother “T”. All 4 children were in the same foster home in Calgary. The 13 year old said he got the idea from watching gay pornography available in the home.
Date: 2012-01-03
Placement type: Foster care
Type of abuse: Sexual abuse
Abuser: Foster sibling

Location

calgary, Alberta
Canada

See map: Google Maps

Recent Child Abuse Stories

Two recent, disturbing stories of child abuse are receiving a great deal of attention in national media; the international child pornography ring which was busted, and Warren Jeffs’ conviction on child sexual abuse charges.

U.S. authorities said Wednesday they have pulled apart a worldwide child pornography operation that traded images and video of the sexual abuse of children under the age of 12, some as young as infants. Investigators describe this as the largest prosecution ever of an online child pornography operation. An estimated 600 people used a private, members-only Internet bulletin board called Dreamboard to access the graphic images.

To maintain membership status, participants were required to continually upload images of child sexual abuse. Those who created new images of child sexual abuse were placed in a special category that gave them access to the bulletin board’s complete quantity of child porn. The massive collection was estimated to include tens of thousands of images of child abuse, or enough to fill 16,000 DVDs. Members hid their activities using sophisticated encryption.

Federal prosecutors filed charges against 72 people. “These were some of the most disturbing images, I think, you will ever see. It’s hard to imagine a penalty severe enough,” said Attorney General Eric Holder.

This week, Warren Jeffs, ecclesiastical head of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, was sentenced to life in prison for sexually assaulting an underage girl he had taken as a “spiritual” bride. He was sentenced to an additional 20 years in prison for the sexual assault of another of his “spiritual” wives, a 15-year-old.

One piece of evidence was an audiotape of what prosecutors said was Jeffs sexually assaulting one of his victims when she was 12 years old. A nephew of Jeffs, now 28, testified that his uncle raped him when he was 5, telling him that “this is God’s work.” A niece, also now 28, alleged that Jeffs sexually abused her at the age of 7.For every story of child abuse and exploitation we see in the news, there are thousands of other stories, just as real, just as horrifying, that receive no media coverage at all. Hopefully, these children have the attention of concerned, caring citizens who recognize what’s happening to them and reach out to help.

When we see terrible stories of child abuse in the news, it’s easy to think this is happening somewhere far away, to people we don’t know. But how many of us know someone who has been impacted personally by child abuse? How many of us have been directly impacted in some way? How many of us talk about it?Maybe someone you care about has told you of childhood events that they’d like to forget. Or maybe you have your own very personal experience.It might surprise you to learn that the odds are actually quite high that each one of us knows several people who have been affected personally by child abuse. It could be a neighbor, a friend, or a co-worker. It could be the nurse who took care of a loved one in the hospital, someone we worship with, or someone who teaches or coaches our children. In fact, it might be all of these people. All around us there are people who suffered from abuse or neglect, people who live with the lasting impact on their emotional and physical health. And there are children suffering today.Why do we tolerate this? Why do we let it go on?

Every one of us can do something about it. Find out what’s happening in your community to protect children from abuse and neglect. Ask about child protection policies at your place of worship, and in sports organizations for kids. Volunteer your time and share your resources with programs that are working to protect children. Encourage people you know to do something about it. Use the power of your voice. Talk about it. Share this article with your friends. Use Facebook and Twitter to tell people that we can all do something about child abuse. We are. You can.

Chris Newlin is Executive Director of the National Children’s Advocacy Center in Huntsville, Alabama. He is active in spreading awareness of child abuse issues across the United States and internationally. He urges every member of every community to get involved in child abuse prevention and response, and take action to protect children and secure our future.
For more information, visit  www.nationalcac.org

Since 2007, 175 children in Colorado have died of abuse and neglect – beaten, starved, suffocated and burned. Deepening the tragedy is that the families or caregivers of 72 of them were known to caseworkers whose job was to protect them.

Mary Ann Hartman worried the little girl across the street was going to die.

A GRAVE FOR A LITTLE GIRL.Alize Vick, left whose body rests at Roselawn Cemetery in Pueblo, was killed at the age of 2 in October 2007 after her foster mother, Jules Cuneo, hurled her five feet, head-first into a coffee table. Based on the reports filed by her foster mother, Alize was extremely accident prone during the five months she lived with Cuneo. But a neighbor, Mary Ann Hartman, could hear what was going on inside the house through a baby monitor and began recording what prosecutors later described as the ongoing torture and abuse of Alize by Cuneo. The recording wouldn’t be enough. (Craig F. Walker, The Denver Post)

Hartman’s baby monitor captured the 23-month-old’s screams and stifled sobs as her 300-pound foster mother sat on her.She recorded the horror coming from the house where the foster mother yelled and ridiculed and the children cried.

Hartman mailed the recording to El Paso County child welfare authorities with a note: “She really needs you. I am doing my part by writing to you, but you must do the rest.”

Then Hartman waited. She called the county when she heard more screaming, when she heard foster mother Jules Cuneo refuse to give the toddler food.

She wondered if anyone would rescue the girl with the toothy grin and big brown eyes.

No one did.

More than 40 percent of the children who died of abuse and neglect in the last six years in Colorado had families or caregivers known to child protection workers who could have saved them.

Those 72 children – many beaten, starved, suffocated or burned – died despite warnings from relatives, neighbors, teachers and strangers, or even the baby monitor recording of blatant abuse sent to caseworkers. Many of their deaths were not only preventable, they were foretold.

It happens, on average, every 30 days. Somewhere in Colorado, a police officer investigates a child’s death from abuse and neglect only to learn the victim is a familiar face to county social workers.

Nine such kids have died so far this year.

A Denver Post and9Newsinvestigation of the Colorado child welfare system revealed a pattern of disturbing failures in which warnings were ignored, cases closed without even a visit and children given to foster parents who killed them.

Caseworkers and their supervisors failed to complete investigations in the time required by law 18 times before children ended up dead. They routinely — at least 31 times — did not contact neighbors and acquaintances who might have told them a child was at risk of harm or even death. More than half of the time, caseworkers violated at least one state rule when conducting abuse investigations, according to an analysis of fatality case reviews by the state Department of Human Services.

The system is plagued by a lack of accountability and transparency — every county in Colorado decides how to run its own child protection department, with minimal input from the state. It is so disjointed, state officials cannot pinpoint the average workload of caseworkers, and cannot fire or discipline a county employee.

Despite years of warnings from expert panels and earnest expressions of concern from three governors and legions of legislators, Colorado’s $375 million system to protect kids from dying remains stubbornly broken.

More kids have died of abuse and neglect in this state in the last five years than in the five years before that, and an increasing number of those children were known to child welfare workers before they were killed. This is despitethe highly publicized starving death of 7-year-oldChandler Grafnerin 2007 that galvanized attention on the child welfare system.

“It’s 2012, and all the advancements we have in our society, whether it’s technological or medical, we can’t figure out how to keep kids safe?” said Stephanie Villafuerte, director of the Rocky Mountain Children’s Law Center, a nonprofit law firm that often represents foster children. “You are talking about dead children.”

CAREGIVER Jules Cuneo, who was the foster mother for 2-year-old Alize Vick, is serving a 32-year prison sentence for the child’s death. (handout)

No one at El Paso County took Mary Ann Hartman’s letter and baby monitor recording seriously enough.

Alize Vick, the girl across the street, died five months later, in October 2007, after her foster mother hurled her five feet, head-first into a coffee table. Cuneo was enraged because the toddler wouldn’t talk to her.

A caseworker said she listened to the recording and visited the home. But the worker determined it wasn’t enough to take Alize away from Cuneo.

In many other cases that resulted in dead children, a caseworker never came at all.

Almost half of the children known to social services who died of abuse and neglect since 2007 had at least one call “screened out,” or not investigated, because child welfare workers deemed the allegations did not meet the threshold for child abuse or they didn’t have enough information.

Caseworkers had seven chances to helpCiarea Witherspoon‘s family before she was left alone in a bathtub.

Seven times — the majority of them before Ciarea was born — someone called authorities to say things were not right at the family’s house. The allegations piled up.

What would it take for authorities to intervene?

Not the reports of guns and fighting. Not the claims that her father threatened to throw her mother in the trash and that he threatened to kill her. Ciarea’s 7-year-old brother had bruises and went to school with a black eye. Her brother was covered in feces, acted much younger than his age, and he sometimes pretended to slam his head into a wall and said his stepfather hurt him. He told people at school he might get cocaine under the Christmas tree.

In every instance, authorities chose not to intervene. Three of the seven calls were screened out. The four other times, caseworkers assessed whether there were safety threats and ultimately recommended against opening an investigation.

Then in June 2009, 6-month-old Ciarea and her 2-year-old brother were left alone at bath time. By the time her father returned from answering the door and cooking some chicken, she was face down in the water and unresponsive. She lived for nine more months — on a ventilator, with a feeding tube and a leg amputated due to an infection.

As she lay unconscious in the hospital, the state put her in foster care. Ciarea died March 18, 2010.

Problems were “training issues”

Caseworkers assigned to Ciarea’s family violated several state regulations, including failing to interview key people after allegations of abuse prior to thelittle girl’s death. Arapahoe County officials told The Post there was “absolutely no connection” between the policy violations and the girl’s death, and that the problems were caseworker “training issues.”

That happens regularly.

In more than half of child abuse deaths in the last six years, caseworkers did not follow state policy regarding how to investigate neglect and abuse allegations, according to The Post’s review of state fatality reports. Of 59 reports released to the newspaper, 31 listed violations of state rules.

Caseworkers erred by screening out calls that deserved follow-up, failing to check on children within the time allowed by law and neglecting to communicate with law officers or another county’s child welfare division when a child moved, according to state reviews of the deaths.

Each case is a judgment call, and caseworkers can’t always prevent evil, said Ruby Richards, child protection manager for the Colorado Department of Human Services.

“Caseworkers don’t kill these kids,” she said.

Since 2007, the state has reviewed the deaths of 30 children who had an assigned caseworker — a worker who at minimum was tasked with visiting a home to find out whether ongoing oversight was needed. These are cases where allegations were not screened out but were elevated to require at least one follow-up.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS.Maria Gardner stands in her room at the Denver Women’s Correctional Facility in Denver. Gardner poured gasoline over her five children then lit them on fire, killing 16-month-old Ashya Joseph and severely burning the other four on Jan. 28, 2008. In a plea agreement, she pleaded guilty to child abuse causing death and four counts of child abuse causing serious bodily injury. Gardner is now serving 85 years in prison. Gardner says the Department of Human Services should have done more. “They should have taken my children from my home, and they should have put me somewhere ” (Craig F. Walker, The Denver Post)

That included Maria Darlene Gardner and her family.

El Paso County caseworkers were warned on Jan. 23, 2008, by an employee at a family services center that Gardner, distraught over her husband’s suicide, was making funeral arrangements for herself and her five young children.

A caseworker tried to “problem solve” with Gardner and helped her make a plan for babysitting so Gardner could go to therapy. The caseworker called Gardner the next day, and the mother told her she was “fine” and not suicidal. But five days later, on Jan. 28, Gardner gathered her five children in her Colorado Springs home, doused them with gasoline and set them on fire.

Four children survived, but not 16-month-oldAshya Joseph.

One child was on fire as he called 911.

“Why did you? … You killed them. Why did you kill them? I loved them,” the 8-year-old boy says during the phone call. The children’s burns covered 20 to 90 percent of their bodies.

Before Gardner set the fire,she looked into a video camera and explained she couldn’t live now that her husband was dead, and she wanted to bring her kids with her. She is serving an 85-year prison sentence.

A state review of Ashya’s deathfound El Paso County caseworkers had been alerted to problems involving physical abuse in the home six other times, beginning in 2004, but did not remove the children.

The job of a caseworker is partly about following the law and partly about following instinct.

Caseworkers teeter along a thin line of respecting people’s rights to privacy in raising their children and the legal definition of abuse and neglect.

Parents can spank their kids, but they aren’t allowed to leaveserious bruises, bleeding, burns or bone fractures, according to state law. The law doesn’t say what age a child can stay home alone; it’s a judgment call.

State law says child abuse includes the failure to provide “adequate food,” but that’s not exactly black and white. Just because a child’s home has only a half loaf of bread and Pop-Tarts to last two weeks, that isn’t necessarily cause to assign a caseworker.

The law also says abuse investigators must consider “accepted child-rearing practices” of the child’s culture.

Caseworkers are criticized when they tear children away from their parents and crucified when a child on their watch ends up dead.

“Social services is damned if we do and damned if we don’t,” Richards said.

State officials concede there are failures, times when inaction ends in a child’s death, but that there are examples, too, when a caseworker does everything right and a child still dies.

Gov. John Hickenlooper said caseworkers are “doing some of the hardest jobs on earth”and that state officials are reviewing child deaths, looking for ways caseworkers can improve.

“Was it they were busy? Were they overworked? Did they make several calls and they couldn’t connect on this allegation of neglect? They made three calls and they just got distracted?” he said. “What we’ve tried to do is create solutions for those parts of the problem we control.”

SAYING GOODBYE TO A BABY.Torrey Brown Sr., 26, talks with his mother Corinthiah Brown and funeral director Jehn-ai Jackson at Caldwell-Kirk Mortuary in Denver on June 3, 2012. Brown was making service arrangements for his son, Torrey Brown Jr., above. The Commerce City Police Department found the remains of the 6-month-old infant May 31, 2012, at the Denver Arapahoe Disposal Site. Sharrieckia Page, 23, the baby’s mother, is charged with first-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death. Torrey Sr. says the Department of Human Services should have done more, “She talked about doing something before. Everybody took her serious but the Department of Human Services. She would call and make threats, ‘I’m going to choke him ‘” (Craig F. Walker, The Denver Post)

In the case of littleTorrey Brown Jr., a caseworker chose not to intervene after the baby’s grandmother warned his life was in danger.

Torrey’s mother had said he was a crybaby, that she was going to strangle him, that he would end up in a casket, the infant’s father and grandmother recalled.

Torrey’s grandmother, Corinthiah Brown, got to keep Torrey for only one night after she told an Adams County caseworker she feared for his life. Then, after the caseworker told her she was overreacting, Brown said, she was ordered to give him back.

The baby was gone within a few months.

After a painstaking, 52-day search through trash 20 feet deep at a Commerce City landfill,authorities found Torrey’s remains in May.Police say his mother suffocated the 6-month-old baby and threw him away.

Brown wishes caseworkers had taken her more seriously. And she wishes that even when they didn’t that she hadn’t backed down.

“I tried to stay out of the way,” she said, tears streaking her cheeks as she sat in her Aurora living room. “I never thought it would turn out like this. This is what I get.”

The state does not track whether its child welfare workers are overburdened with work, whether they are overwhelmed with so many kids they don’t try as hard as they should to talk to relatives, neighbors and babysitters to find out whether kids were safe.

Sharrieckia Page, 23, Torrey Brown’s mother, is charged with first-degree murder and child abuse resulting in death.

Colorado is one of 11 states that do not report caseload data to the federal government.

In this state, each county decides what to pay caseworkers and how much work to give them. Expert panels have suggested the state study staff workloads, but state officials said that is not a priority.

The number of calls reporting alleged child abuse and neglect has jumped 20 percent from 2007 to fiscal 2011, yet the number of investigations opened based on those referrals went up by only 5 percent. In fiscal year 2011, only about half of the 107,854 referrals were investigated.

And state officials do not know whether Colorado has more caseworkers now than it did five or 10 years ago; counties, which are in charge of their workers, aren’t required to tell the state.

Adams County, for one, has three fewer caseworkers now than five years ago. In the same span, annual referrals regarding child abuse and neglect increased by 1,245.

Child advocates question whether there are an adequate number of caseworkers and whether Colorado and its counties spend enough to retain the best workers.

“You actually do get what you pay for,” said Des Runyan, executive director ofThe Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect, who is frustrated by what he sees as Colorado’s minimalist spending on child abuse prevention. “The good people find other things to do.”

Colorado’s two previous governors — a Democrat and a Republican — zeroed in on one key flaw that hinders child safety in Colorado: a county-run child welfare system with limited state oversight.

After 7-year-old Grafner’s death in 2007, then-Gov. Bill Ritter, a Democrat, created an expert panel to study child welfare. Grafner, who starved to death, had been trapped in a linen closet with no food or water and only a litter box to go to the bathroom, even as school officials called child welfare authorities.

The committee worked for two years,putting forth 34 recommendations for changes in law and policy. Some eventually became reality, including a caseworker-training academy now open in Parker. But two of the biggest reforms died in a political battle that pitted county commissioners against state officials and child advocates.

The panel of child welfare experts wanted a statewide hot line to report child abuse, a central place to screen calls. And they wanted a regionalized system, where rural counties would combine resources and expertise.

“We looked at the urgency of this because of the well-being of children, who one way or another seemed to be falling through the cracks in the most fatal ways,” said Ritter, who called the “turf issue” with counties one of the most contentious of his tenure. It was “terribly frustrating,” he said, that his child welfare task force could not get statewide data because each county has its own authority.

Former Gov. Bill Owens, a Republican who held the office before Ritter, recalled the same problem.

“We have a real challenge because authority is so diffused,” he said. “Where you would think that a governor and a state have the responsibility and authority, in many cases they don’t. While many of our counties have very strong departments of social services, regrettably, some do not, and it’s very hard to establish statewide accountability and structure when there are such huge variations.”

Hickenlooper stopped short of calling for less county control, but said he might consider it in a few years if his administration’s reforms don’t work.

Hickenlooper’s key effort is a state scoring system, created by the new director of the Colorado Department of Human Services, that rates counties’ handling of child abuse investigations. He hopes public pressure will encourage county departments to improve their work, even though county-by-county ratings do not appear on a state website that shows how the state stacks up against federal guidelines and past performance.

“We are always going to be one step removed because the counties are going to have that ultimate control,” Hickenlooper said. “Now the only way that I can see that the state can begin to exert serious authority … is through transparency.”

Reggie Bicha, Executive Director for the Colorado Department of Human Services (Craig F. Walker, The Denver Post)

It’s one reform in a list of overhauls announced by Human Services directorReggie Bicha, who took over the department in January. He also has called for clearer and more consistent procedures across all counties.

“We are trying to shift a huge ocean liner in our child welfare culture in Colorado,” Bicha said. “I want us to turn the boat in a better direction for kids and families.”

About 30 kids, on average, die of abuse and neglect in Colorado each year, putting the state among the top half nationally in per-capita death rates. Since 2007, 175 children have died of abuse and neglect in Colorado.

“It’s all of our fault,” said Skip Barber, executive director of the Colorado Association of Family and Children’s Agencies, a group of not-for-profit advocacy agencies.

More often than not, child abusers are the children’s own parents, a relative or their mother’s boyfriend. Those are the people to blame.

But the blame stretches further, experts said.

“Children don’t vote. They don’t have a strong enough advocacy,” said Tracey Feild, director of the child welfare strategy group at theAnnie E. Casey Foundation. “There is an assumption that abused and neglected children are only ‘those’ people.”

Clearly, though, even when people plead for help, that is not always enough.

The El Paso County caseworker who listened to the baby monitor audio recordings of 2-year-oldAlize Vicksaid there wasn’t enough evidence to remove Alize from the foster home. The worker was reassigned to another county job, and the county revamped its practices so it could, among other things, react faster to help children in danger. The foster mother, Cuneo, is serving a 32-year prison sentence.

The girl’s neighbor who had recorded the abuse, Mary Ann Hartman, would tell a state Senate committee that El Paso County ignored her.

“I believe that preconceived ideas and attitudes can run through an institution like a virus,” she said. “I was met with skepticism and disrespect.”

She had written a letter, called and met authorities — but could not get their attention, Hartman said.

“I was in total disbelief … I was trying to save a little girl, and they would not believe me,” she said. “I kept telling them, she is going to kill the little girl. She will kill her, and they still did not believe me.”


Jennifer Brown: 303-954-1593 orjenbrown@denverpost.com;Christopher N. Osher: 303-954-1747 orcosher@denverpost.com;Jordan Steffen: 303-954-1794 orjsteffen@denverpost.com

Colorado Child Abuse Referrals

View an interactive version of this graphic, and search Colorado’s child abuse referrals by county, type and year.


Child fatality reviews

When a child who was part of the child welfare system dies of abuse or neglect in Colorado, county and state officials complete a child fatality review. Many of the findings in this series come from those reports.

Caseworkers, county child protection supervisors and state officials review each fatal case — including any referrals involving the family before the child was born — to create a detailed history of involvement in the system. The review team identifies any risk factors that were present for the child or the family before the death.

The review determines whether there were any concerns or policy violations in the way caseworkers investigated claims of child abuse or neglect, said Ruby Richards, child protection manager for the state.

But the parameters for when and how a report is completed have fluctuated.

In 2011, state officials excluded an unknown number of children’s deaths from ever being reviewed by decreasing the amount of time within the child welfare system — from within the last five years to within the last two years — necessary to trigger a review.

Also, beginning in 2012, reports provided fewer details about the child and the child’s family history with the department, Richards said. Instead of a narrative style, information was provided in a list format. The reports also listed fewer violations of state regulations, noting the violations only if officials determined they were “systemic” concerns.

“Pointing out an isolated issue doesn’t seem fair,” Richards said earlier this year.

In the course of a Denver Post investigation, state officials stopped the release of any other reports so that they could redo them in a format they say is more transparent.

Read more:Abused children’s cries for help were ignored – The Denver Posthttp://www.denverpost.com/failedtodeath/ci_21957329/abused-childrens-cries-help-were-ignored#ixzz2KG28so8K
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Read more:Abused children’s cries for help were ignored – The Denver Posthttp://www.denverpost.com/failedtodeath/ci_21957329/abused-childrens-cries-help-were-ignored#ixzz2KG22BFdP
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Read more:Abused children’s cries for help were ignored – The Denver Posthttp://www.denverpost.com/failedtodeath/ci_21957329/abused-childrens-cries-help-were-ignored#ixzz2KG1b4900
Read The Denver Post’s Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

Imageing

Please Don’t Let Them Hurt Your Children

What exactly constitutes abuse? …Emotional, verbal, physical, sexual abuse and neglect are all the most well known forms of child abuse…..

Song: Dear Mr.Jesus
lyric:
Dear Mr. Jesus, I just had to write to you
Something really scared me, when I saw it on the news
A story ’bout a little girl beaten black and blue
Jesus, thought I’d take this right to you

Dear Mr. Jesus, I don’t understand
Why they took her mom and dad away
I know that they don’t mean to hit with wild and angry hands
Tell them just how big they are I pray

Please don’t let them hurt your children
We need love and shelter from the storm
Please don’t let them hurt your children
Won’t you keep us safe and warm

Dear Mr. Jesus, they say that she may die
Oh I hope the doctors stop the pain
I know that you could save her and take her up to the sky
So she would never have to hurt again

Please don’t let them hurt your children…

Dear Mr. Jesus, please tell me what to do
And please don’t tell my daddy
But my mommy hits me, too.

Please don’t let them hurt your children….

I apologize in advance for the following stories.

 

Child Abuse ~ The Slaughter of Innocents

Credit Source :Hustler

Please note that the images are graphic and disturbing. They are the original images.

Statistics alone cannot convey the horror of physical assaults upon children in our society. The Uniform Crime Reportsdescribe the various means by which adults murder their infants and children: shooting, stabbing, bludgeoning, burning, poisoning, strangling, suffocating, and using explosives.

“A woman who is eight-and-a-half months’ pregnant was under arrest on a murder charge at Fordham Hospital today after the death of her battered two-and-a-half-year-old daughter…. The child had multiple lacerations and many scars and bruises.” — New York Post, March 29, 1974.

“A crippled seven-year-old child, whose abuse apparently included having the words ‘I cry’ burned into his back with a cigarette, was wheeled into a Harris County (Texas) courtroom in a crib today…. The boy, described by one witness as ‘bright, but a loner’ prior to his injuries, had suffered a ruptured colon from something inserted into his anus, and the ensuing infections resulted in brain damage.” — Washington Post, May 5, 1977.

“Linda Fay Burchfield [has been] charged with imprisoning her daughter Patti in a closet for four years… Last July 5th, police burst into the home and found Patti. She weighed 23 pounds and was less than three feet tall, about half the normal size of a nine-year-old. On the same day, Patti’s sister Donna, then 13, was having an abortion…. Mrs. Burchfield’s husband has been charged with raping Donna.” — Washington Star, March 17, 1977.

Is child abuse a crime? This child’s identity is protected because the courts may return the girl to her father, who beat her so severely she suffered brain damage.


Rather than the milk of human kindness, this child received a faceful of scalding milk. The child needs love and affection — not abuse.

Can a child develop healthy attitudes toward others if he is tied to his bed with wire as punishment for bet-wetting?


A little boy after being punched in the mouth by his father,

How can children enjoy liberty and happiness when adults inflict pain upon them, exploit them and deprive them of physical affection? We are architects of violence against ourselves and our children, and we are the ones who must change the moral architecture of Western civilization.

Monsters Walk Among Us

I don’t apologise for posting this ….MONSTERS walk amongst us…..

It’s funny how everyone knows when it’s ‘show your cleavage day’ but few are aware when its ChildProtection week………………Make a difference. Not just for one week… Make it a lifelong commitment!

BLUE RIBBON AGAINST Child Abuse. 

My name is Sarah
I am but three,
my eyes are swollen
I cannot see.
image001

I must be stupid,
I must be bad,
what else could have made
my daddy
 so mad?

I wish I were better,
I wish I weren’t ugly,

then maybe my Mommy
would still want to hug me.

I can’t speak at all,
I can’t do a wrong
or else I’m locked up
all the day long.

When I awake I’m all alone
the house is dark
my folks aren’t home.

When my Mommy does come
I’ll try and be nice,

so maybe I’ll get just
one whipping tonight.

Don’t make a sound!
I just heard a car
my daddy is back
from Charlie’s Bar.

I hear him curse
my name he calls
I press myself
against the wall.
image002

I try and hide
from his evil eyes
I’m so afraid now
I’m starting to cry.

He finds me weeping
he shouts ugly words,
he says its my fault

that he suffers at work.

He slaps me and hits me
and yells at me more,
I finally get free
and I run for the door.

He’s already locked it
and I start to bawl,
he takes me and throws me
against the hard wall.
image003

I fall to the floor
with my bones nearly broken,
and my daddy continues
with more bad words spoken.

‘I’m sorry!’ I scream
but its now much too late
his face has been twisted
into unimaginable hate.

The hurt and the pain
again and again
oh please God, have mercy!
oh please let it end!

And he finally stops
and heads for the door,
while I lay there motionless
sprawled on the floor.
image004

My name is Sarah
and I am but three,
tonight my daddy
murdered me.

There are millions of children in the world – just like Sarah. And you can help!

image005

It sickens me to read this and view these images. It’s a violation of everything that we as human beings stand for. This will disturb even the toughest of the tough! And because you are affected, you can do something about it!! This is real, it happens, it is happening everywhere in the world today. People like Sarah’s father do live in our society. If every concerned person makes an effort to contribute either by time, resources or donations, we can make a difference in the lives of those little people who cannot speak for themselves. You can help to change a child’s life!

Ohio toddler found dead of malnutrition, siblings removed from home

November 12th, 2012 by  | Permalink

An 18-month-old Ohio boy was found dead last week after his oldest sibling found him in a bedroom unresponsive.

All boy’s siblings have since been removed from the home while their parents are being investigated for child neglect. The parents could face possible manslaughter charges.

When police arrived at the Ohio home last Tuesday, they found seven children, including the deceased toddler, all suffering from various medical concerns stemming from alleged gross negligence. A 6-year-old child was reportedly found weighing only 23 pounds. Medics took several of the children to the hospital for treatment. Police report the house was also in total disarray and unkempt.

An autopsy on the deceased toddler named Isaac Bartholomew, revealed he was “extremely malnourished and dehydrated.”

According to 10 TV News, the parents, Adrienne Bartholomew, 34, and James Brothers, 33, were interviewed by the Erie County Sheriff’s Office and they claimed that most of their children, ranging in age 2 – 11, suffer from physical and mental disabilities and require full time care.